5G FAQ

 May 27, 2020   |    Black Box

What is 5G?

5G is the fifth generation of cellular wireless/mobile technology. First there was 1G that was built from nothing — a clean sheet of paper. Every subsequent generation (2G, 3G, and 4G) has been incrementally built on top of the preceding generation. Specifically, 5G promises to deliver 1) speeds in excess of 1 Gbps up to ten times faster than 4G, 2) ultra-low latency <1 mSec, and 3) effective IoT to a massive number of devices. Because 5G offers higher speeds, low latency, and greater bandwidth than its predecessors, it will affect every aspect of the healthcare ecosystem from improved patient care and clinician satisfaction, faster diagnostics, remote monitoring, and more.

What is the difference between 4G and 5G?

There are two frequency bands that 5G networks can operate on: sub-6 GHz and above 30 GHz millimeter waves (mmWave). 4G networks typically use frequencies below 2.5 GHz and travel long-distances. 5G low-band transmissions will offer much higher speeds than 4Gat the same distances.

There are two frequency bands that 5G networks can operate on: sub-6 GHz and above 30 GHz millimeter waves (mmWave). 4G networks typically use frequencies below 2.5 GHz and travel long-distances. 5G low-band transmissions will offer much higher speeds than 4Gat the same distances.Low-band frequencies, such as the sub-6 GHz range, will be used to enable quicker downloads of patient data, expand telemedicine, advance data analytics, and improve critical-care communications.

The high frequencies, above 30 GHz, hold long-term promise for the ultra-reliable, low-latency communications (URLLC) for robotic surgery, augmented  and virtual reality, real-time remote monitoring, transmitting large imaging files, AI, and much more. They can carry a lot of data very quickly and are better for use in high-density, high-traffic areas. But millimeter wave networks are limited in range so many more small antennae have to be installed for direct line-of-sight service. The smaller 5G antennas provide precise directional control whereas 4G towers send data in all directions.

What will happen to 4G?

4G isn’t going away and there will be no hard cut over. 4G and 5G will coexist. For instance, if your device drops a 5G signal, it will fall back on 4G LTE.

When will 5G arrive?

5G is here, but it is not widespread — yet. The first release of 5G, in late 2017 by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), was for non-stand-alone 5G New Radio (NR). In June 2018, the 3GPP finalized Release 15 (R15) for stand-alone 5G. Currently, all the major carriers are starting to roll out fixed and mobile 5G services in more than 35 major metropolitan areas.

When will 5G really arrive for me?

2020 should see 5G make a more meaningful impact. While there are some 5G devices and smartphones available now, Apple plans on introducing its first 5G iPhone in 2020. That will drive the demand for more widespread 5G use particularly by physicians and clinicians who prefer to use their mobile phones.

If you have a modern 4G DAS system now, you can probably transition to 5G will little or no system enhancements. If you have an older system, you will most likely require infrastructure upgrades.

Why is 5G taking so long?

There are a number of reasons including the high-cost to implement the 5G mmW network, and the acquisition of local regulatory approvals for construction of the dense antenna sites. It’s estimated that telecom companies will invest as much as $275 billion into 5G infrastructure before 2025.

Does 5G mean I should avoid investment in LTE technologies?

No. LTE growth will continue. Since many bands currently used for 3G and LTE will be reallocated to 5G over the coming years, building a strong RF path today will ensure a solid 5G foundation tomorrow. While 5G is in its infancy, 4G is just now reaching maturity and will operate in parallel with 5G at least for the next five years.,

What is 5GE vs 5G?

5G E is not 5G. It stands for 5G Evolution and it’s the name for AT&T’s existing 4G LTE Advanced service.

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